About Fitness Pain Free

Hi, I’m Dan Pope.Dan Stone

I’m a physical therapist, crossfit coach and competitor, amateur gymnast and self proclaimed meathead.  If you, your athletes or patients are on the quest for pain-free, peak performance, you’ve come to the right place.  My guiding principle for this site is simple:

I’m here to help get you and your athletes out of pain and back to high levels of performance

If you or your clients are on the quest for pain-free, peak performance, you’ve come to the right place.  Millions of visitors have been to my site over the past 8 years and I welcome you as well!

So Dan, what’s your story?  What do you do for a living and how did you get there?

dan-lecture-editedGood Question!  I developed a passion for fitness at a very early age.  I was blessed with a family that set me on the right track from the start.  I remember my family encouraging me to stay active growing up and I’d come home from school every day at the ripe old age of 10 and do pull-ups, pushups and sit-ups.  I don’t even recall what my motivation was for this initially but I do remember loving it and being very motivated from the get-go.

This led me to start reading and applying everything I could get my hands on in terms of weight lifting and nutrition.  I can’t even tell you some of the stupid things I tried in pursuit of health and muscle.  When I was initially trying to gain muscle-mass I’d set an alarm in the middle of the night so I could eat a full plate of food to help me grow.  Without knowing it I’d usually wake up, turn off the alarm and go back to sleep, only to wake in the morning frustrated with a pile of cold food staring at me.

I eventually had to start hiding the alarm clock under my dresser so when the alarm went off I’d literally stand in the middle of my room confused about where the alarm was coming from until I was alert enough to realize what was going on.  Then I’d sleepily slam down way too much food and go back to sleep dreaming of bigger biceps.

This passion led me to a diverse sport background, trying 6 different sports in high school.  Eventually I settled on pole-vaulting in track and field allowing me to compete at a national level in high school and eventually to go on to compete at a division 1 level in college at Rutgers.

I had no idea what career to take after college, all I knew was I loved exercise and nutrition, so that’s what I studied in college ending with a B.S. in exercise science and a minor in nutrition.  After college I began working as a personal trainer and sports performance coach.  I loved it.  The only problem was that I was always working with people that were injured or dealing with pain somehow.  It bothered me that I didn’t fully understand their injuries and the communication between doctor, therapist and coach was usually abysmal or non-existent.  I decided I wanted to know more about this rehabilitation stuff.

This led me to pursue my doctorate in physical therapy.  I wanted to know the best ways to prevent and rehabilitate injuries.  On top of that, through my trials and tribulations with reading and application I learned that a holistic approach was important to success in fitness and health.  A well rounded approach that included good training along with eating right, sleeping enough, managing stress and recovering properly was not only a factor, but a vital part to success.  I’ve continued to do personal training along the way and I currently coach and train out of a great crossfit gym with excellent people named Crossfit Verve in Denver, CO.  I’m still as feverish as ever to learn and share information and this website has been born as a result of that.

How do you exercise Dan?  Aren’t you into that crossfit stuff?  You lift tires or something too?

Yes Sir!  I currently compete in Crossfit and have a large background training in Strongman.

Ok, so these sports you just mentioned get a lot of grief for being dangerous, what are your thoughts?

I’m glad you asked!  Like any other sport, crossfit, weightlifting or strongman can be dangerous for sure.  I firmly believe that if people train, eat and recover properly they can achieve top levels of performance and avoid common pitfalls such as injury.  You are getting yourself involved in a sport where there is definitely risk involved, but these risks can be minimized.  I’ve made some stupid training decisions in the past that have led to some pretty significant chronic injuries that I’ve been able to turn around with smarter decisions and better lifestyle choices.  Since then I’ve prioritized technique and injury prevention in my training and I urge everyone else to do so as well.

So what sets you apart from the other guys out there?

Dan Progress 8282012I have been practicing what I preach since I started as a young teenager.  There is a lot of information out there but its not all coming from someone who lives and breathes what they speak.  Many people have great information to give but very little discipline and dedication to follow their own advice.  I’ve been an athlete my whole life and I still am.  I don’t just do it because it keeps me fit and its fun.  I feel that it gives me invaluable insight beyond what other trainers and therapists will have and that makes a huge difference.  It helps to keep me honest and to hopefully motivate and inspire others to do the same.

I also believe there is currently a large disconnect between health care professionals (Doctors, Physical Therapists, Chiropractors) and athletes.  In many cases they don’t understand the nuances behind their patient’s fitness goals or sports in order to give their patients the best care.  On top of that many healthcare professionals don’t understand their patient’s passion and desire for their sport simply because they’ve never shared the passion that is associated with high levels of athletic competition.

I don’t want to tell people to stop lifting heavy weights and give up your favorite sports.  These sports drive you and me and give us a strong sense of identity and pride.  I’m an athlete and I’m on your side.  I’m here to link the gap between knowledge and application from healthcare professional to athlete.  Instead of telling people to stop doing what they love, let’s try and learn how to get you back into the game and keep healthy.  Sound like a plan?

Oh, ok.  So what are you trying to accomplish with this site?

Crossfit, strongman and other high intensity sports get a bad rap for being dangerous.  The potential risk of injury in crossfit is the most common reason I hear people bash the sport.  I firmly believe that it’s possible to compete and succeed in these sports in a safer manner.  I also really believe that people are smart.  I’ve been troubleshooting my own health, fitness and performance since I started.  I know others can do the same if they are just given the right resources.  I wanted to provide that resource so that people can excel in sport and fitness and avoid injury.  Hopefully I can help them get back on the right track after they’ve gotten hurt.  People have done the same for me in the past, now it’s time to pay it forward.

I’ve been doing this my entire life.  I’m not out to tell you that there is a single best way to do things or what I’m doing is best.   I’ve been blessed to use exercise as a tool to become the best person I can be and really just want to help people do the same.  This site was developed to help other meatheads achieve their own goals with less pain and better health along the way.

Places you may have seen me before…

  • Mike Reinold’s website: www.mikereinold.com
  • Erson Religioso’s website: www.physioanswers.com and www.themanualtherapist.com
  • Dave Tilley’s www.SHIFTmovementscience.com
  • A Crossfit Journal “offline” segment on safe movement:  www.journal.crossfit.com
  • Power Monkey Fitness Camp – Lecturing about Assessment and injury reduction
  • Barbell Shrugged Podcast
  • www.aaronswanson.com
  • The WOD Talk Website: www.WODtalk.com
  • American Society of Hand Therapists Newsletter

Dan is a Doctor of Physical Therapy graduating from The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey as well as a crossfit coach at Crossfit Verve in Denver Colorado.  He has an enormous passion for fitness, rehabilitation and optimizing human performance.  Dan’s background in athletic performance is extensive, leading to his unique knowledge of rehabilitation as it applies to sport.  Dan’s athletic career began at a very young age but his first major accomplishment was performing as a division 1 pole-vaulter at Rutgers University.  He later went into training for Strongman and competed at a national level for 4 years.  In 2009 Dan won a state title in strongman (NJ) at 200lbs and a national title (US) at 175lbs.  He later went on to start training in crossfit and to date has been to the regionals twice, once as an individual competitor and once as part of a team (Crossfit Verve).  

Dan was also a strength and conditioning coach and personal trainer for 6 years prior to beginning his journey into physical therapy and has continued to be a trainer or coach to this date.  Given this unique background he has a special talent for helping individuals in the strength and fitness world who need either rehabilitation or tips on optimizing performance.  Among his athletic achievements, Dan sat to become Board Certified in Orthopedic Physical Therapy in March of 2016 and is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist through the national strength and conditioning association.

Dan works at Physiotherapy Associates in Greenwood Village Colorado and enjoys working with a large range of patients.  He specializes in treating Crossfit, olympic lifting and strength based athletes.  As much as he likes working with athletes, Dan loves working with regular people looking to enjoy their fitness pain free.  Through strength and conditioning as well as physical therapy he has been able to treat and train athletes all along the spectrum up to the professional, olympic and Crossfit Games level.  Dan has also been working for power monkey fitness from it’s inception and through the company has been able to work alongside and collaborate with olympic level coaches from the world of olympic lifting, gymnastics and rowing.

Aside from working as a physical therapist and coach full-time, Dan owns and operate his own company Fitness Pain Free.  Dan regularly shares his thoughts related to physical therapy and fitness at www.fitnesspainfree.com and has had millions of views on the site over time.  His major goal is to help individuals reach high levels of performance while reducing the likelihood of injury along the way.  Dan also speaks around the United States on the topics of safety and performance in fitness regularly.  In order to help people get in great shape and minimize the likelihood of injury Dan also writes programming online in order to get people in great shape, pain free.  He practices what he preaches and believes that life is ripe for the taking and anyone with the right mindset and work ethic can achieve greatness.

135 Comments on this post.
  • Alois
    22 February 2013 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    Love the podcast but if I had a rec. I would really get someone to help you out with the audio. maybe get better mic’s etc…. quality of material is good- just really hard to hear comparred to other podcasts like caveman doctor or latest in paleo.
    nice work!

    • djpope
      24 February 2013 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Thanks a ton Alois. I get that recommendation quite a bit! You’re absolutely right. Unfortunately college loans don’t make it easy to afford better equip. It’s also tough because we interview others who don’t always have high quality recording equipment(It’s often done over the phone). That being said my next investment is a computer with better editing capabilities! Thanks again buddy and thanks for the response.

  • Mark P
    24 March 2013 at 10:26
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    Dan Pope,
    Thanks for checking out my blog. Your website and articles look very interesting. I also see you’re from NJ and have gone to Rutgers. I’m a native NJ’er myself.
    -Mark P

    • djpope
      24 March 2013 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Thanks Mark, I appreciate it.

  • Alex
    10 July 2013 at 10:26
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    Surfing around the web for fitness stuff and I stumbled onto your page . I like your articles a lot.

    • djpope
      10 July 2013 at 10:26
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      Thank you sir.

    • djpope
      10 July 2013 at 10:26
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      Diggin the photo in your profile! The clam stone!

  • Travis Pollen
    9 September 2013 at 10:26
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    GREAT training video for May 2013, Dan!

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  • Shawn Stadlbauer
    8 December 2013 at 10:26
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    Dan Pope,

    I am 22 currently attending Boise State university. My goal is to do what you and many others have done with Physical Therapy and Crossfit, namely Kelly Starrett. Would you have any advice for me? things that you wish you would have done or maybe some good tips to look out for. I am getting my bachelors in Exercise Physiology and will then continue onward to get my doctorate as PT. I have my Level 1 training Certification in Crossfit, and have been training with CrossFit for about a year. Any tips about what you did or are doing to have a successful career would be greatly appreciated. Love your site and appreciate that you have put so much info out for the public.

    Shawn Stadlbauer

    • djpope
      9 December 2013 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Hey Shawn, thanks for the comment, I get this comment quite a bit. Some things I did and would recommend:

      1) Find a crossfit gym you can train and coach at that has excellent coaches. Get really good at coaching both yourself and your clientele. There are a ridiculous amount of resources out there to improve your skills. Practice on yourself and your clients.
      2) Learn to critically evaluate and correct movement. I really believe it’s important to learn how to properly screen and assess clients/patients on a global level and learn where the problems are and how to address them. I’m a big fan of the functional movement screen and SFMA for this although there is a ton of great stuff out there for this.
      3) Learn above and beyond your curriculum. I can’t tell you the amount of research, webinars, podcasts, books etc etc I’ve listened to over the past few years. Find a few therapists/trainers that you really agree with and start there. Don’t be afraid to branch to others, stay open minded and critical of what you read. I spend atleast 30-60 minutes per day learning and 1 day per week shadowing a smart local therapist.
      4) Start writing – If you want to write then go ahead and start a blog. Start contributing to sites that you enjoy reading from. Start making videos, get comfortable in front of a camera. Start recording yourself (podcast). Perfect your craft
      5) Start speaking – Want to speak? Start getting comfortable in front of an audience. I started speaking at my local gym about weight loss. I branched out to some other local gyms. Since then I’ve had some additional opportunities to speak but I’d love to expand this myself!
      6) Learn Marketing – If you’re looking to get your message out there then you’ve got to learn how to market. My favorite starting resource is the I love marketing podcast, free on itunes.
      7) Get some mentors – I have several and the information you can glean from them is instrumental, they can help you get to where you’d like to be. I have several who are close friends and several who have never heard of me.

      Hope this helps and good luck. Maybe more important then anything else, stay hungry and stay consistent. Rome wasn’t built in a day but if you routinely practice you’ll make enormous strides over time!

      Dan

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  • Caleb
    2 February 2014 at 10:26
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    Hey Dan,
    I recently found your website and thoroughly enjoy your articles. It’s really encouraging to see someone who is so positive and upbeat in regards to overcoming injuries and enjoying pain-free fitness. I have a question in regards to femoral acetabular impingement. Over the past 5-6 months, I have been training hard for the upcoming Crossfit Games Open. I was doing a much higher volume of training than I had ever previously performed during this time period in regards to squatting volume and overall strength volume. I was squatting three days a week (Back Squat one day, Front Squat one day, and Overhead Squat one day). The rep scheme involved a four week cycle where the lifts were 5×5 in week 1, 5×3 in week 2, and 7×1 to establish a 1RM in week 3. Week 4 was a conjugate week. Training went really well for the first 2-3 months doing this style of training. I was hitting PR’s on each of my lifts every 3 weeks and was making great progress. However, I distinctly remember a session during a conjugate week that called for 5×10 Back Squats at 75% of my 1RM. I had just recently hit 415lbs. on my Back Squat, so I was using 315lbs. for this workout. I made it through, but I would definitely say my form was not the best. Ever since that workout, I have had this nagging pain in my groin/inner thigh/hip flexor area on my left side, in addition to a dull lower back pain on my left side. I continued to train through this off and on pain until nearly 3 weeks ago, the pain became so severe that I could no longer squat without a tremendous stabbing pain in my inner thigh/groin area. I went to my local chiropractor, where they took x-rays. They discovered that I have “facet tropism” and “bilateral femoral acetabular hip impingement.” They want me to take 1 1/2 – 2 weeks off to do nothing but stretch, ice, and get treatment. I’ve researched this a great deal and it appears to be quite common in baseball players. I am currently 21 years old and played baseball from the time I was 8 years old until I was 19 years old. I firmly believe that all the years playing baseball contributed to this issue and my recent Crossfit training brought the issue to light. This diagnosis hit home pretty hard because I am very passionate about Crossfit, love to push myself in my training, and was hoping to compete at a high level, as well. It seems like surgery is the only way to remove the abnormal bone growth related to this impingement. What I’m wondering is if I could mobilize around this and get the issue to where it does not cause pain. I would be grateful for any insight and help you can give in relation to this. Thanks for the awesome and informative website!

    • djpope
      2 February 2014 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Hey Caleb, thanks for the kind words. I just want to say that Cam/Pincer deformities are very common in a young athletic people without any history of hip pain. Go ahead and get some help from your medical professional and listen to their advice. Staying away from painful exercises is usually the first step. Crossfit has a large volume of squatting and can end up producing some hip pain. Once you’re back to feeling pain free I’d take a look at your programming and modify the amount of squatting in there. I find that I continue to make great progress without hip problems with my own programming and I only back squat heavy for 1 set 3 times per month and only overhead squat and front squat 3-4 times per month as well.

      • Caleb
        2 February 2014 at 10:26
        Leave a Reply

        Awesome. That’s good to hear. I assumed that I would have to modify my program as far as heavy squats go, but it seems like some people think you should avoid squatting movements entirely with this issue. That was what I was so concerned about. Like I said, I really do love Crossfit training, and I was afraid that I would no longer be able to compete at a high level with all the squatting movements that Crossfit has. I have a few more questions, though. First off, what about movements such as wall balls, thrusters, pistols, air squats, light squat cleans and snatches, etc… Once I am pain free, could I program these more frequently since they do not stress the hips and central nervous system like heavy squats do? Second, would I still be good to go as far as competing in the Open this year? After my two week “deload” that my chiropractor wants me to take, I’ll have about a week and a half to prepare for the first Open workout. Lastly, what mobilizations would be best for this issue? I’ve got K-Star’s “Becoming a Supple Leopard”, and I’ve took several ideas from there. I’ve been smashing my glutes, TFL, and adductors, mobilizing the hip joint to the back of the socket, utilizing the couch stretch, and occasionally doing some yoga-type stretches. The glute and TFL smash seems to provide a pretty good deal of relief. Just wondering if you had any more suggestions as far as mobilizations go, and if you had any ideas for core and stability exercises to strengthen the areas around the hips. Thanks for all the information, Dan! I really appreciate the help!

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  • Matthew Ibrahim
    28 April 2014 at 10:26
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    Hi Dan Pope,

    I am just reaching out as a friend of Dave Tilley. He mentioned your name and your blog for me to follow and I have found your information and blogs to be very useful, especially for a person in my position. Currently, I hold a Bachelor’s Degree in Exercise and Health Sciences, certification as a CSCS through the NSCA, and I’m also an aspiring Doctor of Physical Therapy graduate student. I will be applying to DPT programs in the fall. Your blog and work, along with Dave Tilley and Seth Oberst and Kelly Starrett, is an inspiration for me since I’m also a huge believer of bridging the gap between both worlds: physical therapy and strength & conditioning. Just wanted to say thanks for sharing your stuff and looking forward to reading more.

    If you have any advice for someone in my position then please feel free to share – I’m a huge believer in continued learning and networking with those in a position above myself with more knowledge and experience. My email address is matthew.ibrahim001@gmail.com

    Thank you for your time,
    Matthew Ibrahim

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  • Brandon Knapp
    17 May 2014 at 10:26
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    This website is amazing. I will be returning again. It is time to get my fitness on (DP Style). Very cool articles, videos & motivational words from Dan on this website. Thank you Mr. Pope.

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  • Tim Meevasin
    31 May 2014 at 10:26
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    Hi Dan,

    Great write up on shoulder impingement and the complexity of how the shoulder functions. I am an avid rockclimber and started CF a year ago to improve my strength to weight ratio. I love Muscle ups and saw great gains in climbing from them, but one day felt a sharp inner pain in the front of my shoulder (possible bicep tendonitis) and rested completely for several weeks.

    Long story short, MRI with contrast shows “possible SLAP tear”, but with PT and rest and modified (no overhead or kipping movements) I have recovered to approx 90% after 6 months from the date of first pain but have been stuck at 90%. I fear surgery and want to do everything else possible to avoid it.

    I still get a clicky sensation and feel weakness when my right arm is raised overhead. I almost have to cock my arm out to wash my hair and brush my teeth to avoid that spot that bites. I have read that conservative approaches to SLAP tears are not very effective and surgery is pretty common. Any advice for someone who is terrified of surgery and is motivated and willing to work on rehab with the proper guidance?

    I have seen 3 different PTs and orthos and would be willing to travel to see a specialist like you to help out. Thanks so much for your time. You seem to be wise beyond your years and gifted in what you do.

    Cheers,
    Tim

    • djpope
      8 June 2014 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Hey Tim, thanks for reaching out. When you say 90% what is still limiting? Can you perform pullups and overhead press? Muscle-ups? handstands? You’re right. SLAP tears usually require surgery. If it makes you feel better labral tears are pretty common in an athletic population (I actually have a labral tear in my left shoulder). Depending on your limitations you might be able to get away without surgery. I’d like to know more about what you’re trying to get back to and what still limits you.

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  • Caleb Freeman
    1 October 2014 at 10:26
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    Hey Dan,

    I was doing some Split Jerks today and, while going for a new PR, I heard my right knee pop when I got under the weight. When I split jerk, I go with my left leg forward and right knee back most of the time. Right now, it is painful to bend that knee backwards or do things that mimic a squatting pattern. Really, any kind of bending in that knee is painful. I can fully extend the knee forward, but any type of backward motion sends a shooting pain through the outside of my knee. Does this sound like an ACL injury? I had my camera running when the injury occurred and it appeared that my right knee went down and in when I got under the weight. I really appreciate any help you can give me on this. Thanks!

    Sincerely,
    Caleb Freeman

    • djpope
      7 December 2014 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Hey Caleb, definitely go see a doc for this.

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  • Hans Schulze
    16 January 2015 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    are you active in PT. if so where

    • djpope
      25 January 2015 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Yes sir, physiotherapy associates in greenwood village CO

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  • Lorenzo Tedeschi
    16 February 2015 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    Hi Dan,I’m from Italy(Rome);I’m a ex professional player volley and beach volley,46 years old,1month ago i found a cervical hernia C6-C7.Now i’m doing only ashtanga yoga and traction for my neck.I want to play beachvolley again 1-2 times a week and training again with kettlebell.Do you think is possible?Do you have any suggest?Thanks for all,and sorry for my english.
    Lorenzo

    • djpope
      14 June 2015 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Hey Lorenzo, have you made any progress since this? Seen a physio at all?

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  • Brandon Johnson
    10 April 2015 at 10:26
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    Hi Dan,

    I found your article addressing Crossfit stigmas and your perspective as a physical therapist enlightening and refreshing. I’m working within a DPT research team on a university study about Crossfit. We share your perspective as it relates to treating Crossfitters. We hope that our study contributes to the prevention of injury from Crossfit and also to the longevity of participation whether the participant is injury free or becomes injured and returns to the sport.

    We are Beta-Testing the survey right now and if you would like to take a look at it I’d be happy to share it with you. We’ll be engaged in the project through 2016.

    I’m driven to integrate physical therapy and Crossfit as a positive approach to health and lifestyle. Thanks again for your article.

    Sincerely,

    Brandon Johnson

    • djpope
      14 June 2015 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Definitely Brandon, that sounds great.

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    […] Dan Pope DPT, CSCS […]

  • Ginny
    19 May 2016 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    Hey Dan,
    I paid for the fitness assessments but it won’t open.

    • djpope
      29 May 2016 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Hey Ginny, did it all get sorted out?

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  • ashley mak
    30 June 2016 at 10:26
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    Hey Dr. Pope,

    My name is Ashley and I am a physical therapist and CrossFit coach. I started following your blog a couple years ago, and just listened to your podcast on barbell shrugged. Just wanted to say how awesome it was to hear from other physical therapists and their involvement in fitness.

    Keep up the good work and I look forward to reading more!

  • Jeff
    1 July 2016 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    I have been looking for your podcast on iTunes but I can’t seem to find it. Are they still available and if so where can I find them? Thank you,

    • djpope
      5 August 2016 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Hey Jeff, I’m sorry but I ended up stopping that service because I was paying for it but wasn’t producing podcasts.

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  • kyle
    19 July 2016 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    Hey Dan,
    Awesome articles. Do you know anything about voodoo floss and how it works? I’m curious to know.

    • djpope
      5 August 2016 at 10:26
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      Hahah, no I don’t. I’d be curious what Kelly thinks is happening on a scientific level.

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  • Wendy
    3 August 2016 at 10:26
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    Hey Dan,
    Fellow physical therapist and fairly new to crossfit. Thought you would be a good person to ask this- I know using the hook grip is beneficial in lifts to save your grip. As a PT that does a lot of manual work, I want to save my thumbs and CMC joint (theyre starting to ache a bit already). Would the hook grip add to this wear and tear on my thumb? I am not doing crossfit competitively so would rather go the route that decreased as much load to my thumbs as possible.

    • djpope
      5 August 2016 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Great question Wendy, I honestly don’t know the answer. I imagine that hook grip does actually decrease grip stress to an extent, making it easier to grip the bar. I can’t say that I’ve seen any successful olympic lifters who complain of CMC joint pain nor do I have any issues currently. The hook grip may increase CMC stress but in a different way then our manual techniques. I don’t see hook grip being a major contributor but again I’m not sure.

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  • Dom
    26 August 2016 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    Hi Dan,

    Love the website! It’s really helped me in a number of ways both practically as a coach and academically with my Masters Degree. You’ve also inspired me to look for a similar route in pre/rehabilitation PhD, so thank you. That being said, I have a few questions i’m hoping you could help me with:

    I cant seem to find the latter parts of a mobility assessment series you wrote; HOW TO IMPLEMENT ASSESSMENT AND CORRECTIVE STRATEGIES INTO YOUR BOX: PART 3 – ASSESSING FRONT RACK MOBILITY – it seems it stopped at part 3, leaving the squat and deadlift mobility screen out – is this right, and if so would you be able to help out with links/resources?

    Secondly, I need to create an article demonstrating appropriate warm ups for olympic lifting. I plan on creating a generic one followed by a few specific to the lift you will do in the session. For cleans i was going to focus on the front rack position; mobility of the wrists, triceps and lats. For Snatch, I was thinking overhead mobility and stability?

    And lastly, Do you have any articles on athlete robustness and the testing of? I want to create a testing battery scoring the athlete with a guide on improving weaknesses. Any resources/links/people you could offer would be much appreciated!

    Kind Regards

    • djpope
      21 October 2016 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Hey Dom, thanks for the kind words, Glad you’re going after rehab / prehab. Ha, I never actually finished that article series so I apologize for that. I’ve written plenty on squat mobility assessment. Try googling fitness pain free and overhead and snatch mobility. You’ll get plenty. Also throw 5 minute deadlift mobility into youtube for my video on deadlift/barpath assessment. I don’t have a battery test for robustness. Myself and Dave Tilley created an assessment guide for olympic lifts and basic gymnastics you can find in the store. The guys at FMS are creating a capacity examination I know but haven’t tried it myself yet.

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  • Arsalan
    24 September 2016 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    Hey Dan,
    I used to do workout but then left it after an injury while lifting dumbbells up the shoulder and then recovered after 2 weeks bed rest. 2 months back i had severe pain in my tricep, wrist and area close to my neck probably a cervical pain or a nerve pinch, a result of poor sleeping posture. i lost the strength in my right arm and the tricep muscle is wasted, although there is no pain now but my hand trembles when i do push-ups. my question is whether the exercises of shoulder rehabilitation on your site, will be helpful to regain strength or should i look into some kind of therapy.
    Thanks
    Arsalan

    • djpope
      21 October 2016 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Any type of progressive weakness or muscle wasting in the arm is a definite reason to go see a physician. Definitely speak with that physician before coming back here.

  • Robert cruz
    16 October 2016 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    I am Robert i need a personal trainer for my two daughters they have been adding much weight lately and i believe with a trainer like you they can achieve a good and healthy body so i like to know if there any in-person training or exercise you can offer for the ladies I’m booking this on there behalf and as a surprise they are 19-22 I’m hearing impaired so we can only do text/email I only have my credit card, do you have a card reader to charge my credit card?

    • djpope
      21 October 2016 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Hey Robert, where are you located? It would probably be best to have someone in person. Maybe I can point you in the right direction.

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  • Tyler Nielson
    28 November 2016 at 10:26
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    Mr POPE , This is Tyler in Denver, Im trying to follow up on such an accomplished man… Very impressive site. look forward to hearing from you

    • djpope
      2 January 2017 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Tyler! Whats up buddy. I’ve sent you an email.

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  • Brian
    7 January 2017 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    Here’s what I am interested in learning, whether from you or from another therapist. Either way, i was hoping that you might have the connections to help come up with some guidance.

    I have been using kettle bells more and more with lots of my patients with varying issues. I LOVE training myself and patients with kettlebells.

    I feel that i could use more guidance is the use of kettlebells for post surgical shoulder patients including rotator cuff repairs, SLAP repairs, Bankart,repair etc. I am aware of many exercises that I can use for shoulder rehab but the biggest challenge is knowing which exercises I can safely use and at which phase (WHEN) in the patient’s rehab I can use each exercise. I think that I have a good idea as to which exercises to use when but I would feel better if I could learn how other therapists apply kettlebell exercises to post-surgical shoulder patients. I think it would make a good course or book! Traditional shoulder rehab protocols at from our shoulder docs allow us to use 1-3# dumbbells initially for traditional isotonic exercises. As you know, however, heavier KBs can safely be used for stability based exercises. I have light to heavy kettlebells including 2KG, 4KG, 6KG, 8KG, 12, KG, and 16KG.

    • djpope
      25 January 2017 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Awesome Brian. We use a ton of kettlebells in our rehab programs. Bottoms up work, waiter’s walk variations, get-ups, arm bars etc. Currently myself and Dave Tilley are developing advanced rehab protocols we use and how they fit into protocols. If you want a good webinar on the subject subscribe to Mike Reinold’s inner circle webinar. He has a really good webinar on this subject.

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  • Drew
    29 January 2017 at 10:26
    Leave a Reply

    Good Evening,
    My name is Drew. I was previously a exercise science major using it as a stepping stone for PT school, when I decided to enlist in the navy as a corpsman. My contract will soon be ending and I plan on attending school again, and finding a local box once we move. I’ve listened to the Barbell shrugged podcast that you have been on and worked my way around this site as much as possible. There are endless benefits of finding a successful mentor in a business and field that follows along the course of study that you plan on pursuing. I’m curious if you would be one of my mentors when you have downtime.

    • djpope
      30 January 2017 at 10:26
      Leave a Reply

      Hey Drew, send me an email @ dpopetraining@gmail.com Maybe I can help you out. If not directly then maybe I can point you in the right direction.

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